Big Payday for Same-Sex Married Couples | Advocate.com

A new report indicates it pays to be gay — or bi — and hitched to a member of the same sex.

We all know the stereotype of the typical gay man — uber-successful, well-dressed fellows strolling around P-town, Fire Island and other glamorous haute spots. This pervasive image is double-edged, though, because it fails to acknowledge that just like any other demographic, the population of both gays and lesbians includes those toiling below the poverty line as well as those prospering at the highest echelons.

What interests me most are couples, however. To get an accurate view of the state of gay household finances, I headed over to a new report from the U.S. Department of the Treasurythat provides a fairly accurate financial assessment of same-sex marrieds in the U.S.

I’m happy to announce that gay married men, making on average $176,000 per annum as a couple, clock in at 56 percent ahead of the income of our married straight counterparts. And really big winners of the income-earning contest are gay married couples with children who bring in a whopping $276,000 a year on average. (Of course, DINK — double income, no kids — gay couples lead the way in disposable income, of which, in my opinion, they’re disposing way too much and not saving enough, but that’s another story.)

Female couples aren’t doing too poorly either, bringing in a household average of $124,000, which puts them financially ahead of the average straight married couple, who earn a yearly $113,000.  Of course, nothing justifies the egregious gender pay gap that we’ll also be exploring in more depth in the future.

So what gives? How do we explain the significant income disparities between married heterosexual couples and married same-sex couples? The Treasury Department’s report offers some trenchant insights:

A large proportion of same-sex couples flock to major metropolitan areas — sophisticated seats of power and centers of media, culture, and consumerism — many of which are located on the coasts. These places tend to have higher cost of living but at the same time are the locus for jobs offering commensurate higher pay. Of course gay folks live everywhere but we are significantly better represented in what some would describe as more desirable cities that are, as it happens, the most gay-friendly as well.  Would you rather live in Manhattan, L.A., Miami or San Francisco versus, say, the stomping grounds of Christian supremacist V.P.-elect Mike Pence in Indianapolis or homophobic Pat “The Great Discriminator” McCrory’s Raleigh, N.C.? (No offense to the good people of Charlotte and other towns who worked so diligently to enact LGBT rights ordinances.)

Source: Big Payday for Same-Sex Married Couples | Advocate.com

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To Avoid Supreme Court Decision, Alabama Temporarily Bans Gay Marriage Licenses

Although the Supreme Court last week ruled gay marriage bans unconstitutional, the Alabama Supreme Court on Monday effectively ordered probate judges not to issue same-sex marriage licenses for 25 days. The state’s Supreme Court picked this amount of time because, technically, there is a 25-day period to file a petition to rehear the U.S. Supreme Court case.

However, regardless of any petition period, Alabama must follow the law as set by the U.S. Supreme Court, the highest in the land. For this reason, the Alabama court’s order is confusing.

Source: To Avoid Supreme Court Decision, Alabama Temporarily Bans Gay Marriage Licenses

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Americans exude joy on Gay Pride Day after court ruling

Americans marked Gay Pride Day this year with an extra measure of gusto, turning out en masse at Sunday’s festivities in New York and other cities to celebrate the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling legalizing same-sex marriage across the country.

Two days after the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that the U.S. Constitution provides same-sex couples the right to marry, Governor Andrew Cuomo kicked off the New York City celebration by officiating at the marriage of two men outside of the Stonewall Inn, a Greenwich Village bar that is considered the birthplace of the U.S. gay rights movement.

“I want you to know I’m a little nervous today – it’s my first marriage,” Cuomo joked before marrying a couple in front of a crowd of several dozen onlookers

Source: Americans exude joy on Gay Pride Day after court ruling

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Gay marriage ban costs Michigan tourism industry, says LGBT market researcher | MLive.com

GRAND RAPIDS, MI — There are 37 states with marriage equality and the fact that Michigan isn’t one of them hurts the tourism industry’s bottom line, said a market researcher at the Pure Michigan Governor’s Conference on Tourism this week.

“Whatever percentage of Michigan’s business now is weddings, it could be increased by including LGBTs. Certainly within the state but those who have family here, etc. I think that there’s a lot of opportunity,” said Thomas Roth, president of San Francisco-based Community Marketing, Inc.

He presented a session at the conference, making the business case to hotels interested in marketing to LGBT people.

In a September 2014 survey CMI conducted, they asked 3,503 members of the LGBT community about their travel habits.

No Michigan cities ranked in a top 20 list of leisure destinations for gay and bisexual men. No Michigan cities ranked in the top 20 for lesbian and bisexual women, either.

Wedding travel aside, Michigan is missing out on general LGBT leisure travel due to its marriage prohibition, Roth said.

“So it’s a double-edged sword because on one hand you’re not getting that (wedding) business. On the other hand gays and lesbians are probably not coming here for holiday or vacation as much as they would because it’s not an inclusive state when there’s 37 other choices, right?” Roth said.

via Gay marriage ban costs Michigan tourism industry, says LGBT market researcher | MLive.com.

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Supreme Court dodges gay marriage, allowing weddings in five more states | Reuters

(Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to decide once and for all whether states can ban gay marriage, a surprising move that will allow gay men and women to get married in five additional states, with more likely to follow quickly.

On the first day of its new term, the high court without comment rejected appeals in cases involving five states – Virginia, Oklahoma, Utah, Wisconsin and Indiana – that had prohibited gay marriage, leaving intact lower-court rulings striking down those bans.

As a result, the number of states permitting gay marriage would jump from 19 to 24, likely soon to be followed by six more states that are bound by the regional federal appeals court rulings that had struck down other bans. That would leave another 20 states that prohibit same-sex marriage.

 

But the move by the nine justices to sidestep the contentious issue means there will be no imminent national ruling on the matter, with litigation likely to continue in states with bans.

via Supreme Court dodges gay marriage, allowing weddings in five more states | Reuters.

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Supreme Court Hands Gay Marriage a Tacit Victory – NYTimes.com

WASHINGTON — In a move that may signal the inevitability of a nationwide right to same-sex marriage, the Supreme Court on Monday let stand appeals court rulings allowing such unions in five states.

The development, a major surprise, cleared the way for same-sex marriages in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin. Officials in Virginia announced that marriages would start at 1 p.m. on Monday.

The decision to let the appeals court rulings stand, which came without explanation in a series of brief orders, will almost immediately increase the number of states allowing same-sex marriage from 19 to 24, along with the District of Columbia. The impact of the move will in short order be even broader.Continue reading the main stor

Monday’s orders let stand decisions from three federal appeals courts with jurisdiction over six other states that ban same-sex marriage: Colorado, Kansas, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia and Wyoming. Those appeals courts will almost certainly follow their own precedents to strike down those additional bans as well, meaning the number of states with same-sex marriage should soon climb to 30.

via Supreme Court Hands Gay Marriage a Tacit Victory – NYTimes.com.

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How Same-Sex Marriage Is Unfolding in 11 States – ABC News

The Supreme Court effectively legalized gay marriage in 11 more states Monday, for a total of 30, when it rejected a set of appeals. As many as 60 percent of Americans now live in states where same-sex marriage is legal.

Here’s what’s happening Monday in the affected states:

———

COLORADO

Pueblo County is now issuing marriage licenses to gay couples. The decision from county Clerk Bo Ortiz comes after Republican state Attorney General John Suthers said Monday his office will file motions seeking to quickly lift federal and state court rulings that halted gay marriage. Suthers has yet to advise clerks if they can begin issuing licenses, but Ortiz said there was never a court order against Pueblo County to delay.

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INDIANA

Gov. Mike Pence reaffirmed his commitment to traditional marriage on Monday but said he will follow the law regarding unions of same-sex couples. Pence said people are free to disagree over the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to reject an app…..

via How Same-Sex Marriage Is Unfolding in 11 States – ABC News.

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Supreme Court to Discuss Gay Marriage – Law Blog – WSJ

Mark your calendars: the Supreme Court is scheduled to consider its next steps on gay marriage when the justices meet for the first time since their summer break.

The court on Wednesday listed gay marriage petitions from five states –  Indiana,OklahomaUtahVirginia and Wisconsin – for consideration at its Sept. 29 private conference.  Officials in those states are asking the court to decide whether state bans on same-sex marriage are constitutional.

The justices use the September meeting to wade through stacks of appeals that pile up during the court’s three-month recess.  The court at some point after the conference is expected to add several of those cases to its docket for the term that begins Oct. 6.  Court watchers are eagerly awaiting word on whether one or more gay marriages cases will be among them.

The court is under no obligation to act right away.  It’s possible the court could take additional time to mull its options, particularly because of fast-moving developments in other gay-marriage litigation.

Litigants, as well as lower court judges, are racing to have their voices heard before the Supreme Court makes its next move.  Three federal appeals courts this summer have ruled against state gay-marriage bans, including one that issued a lightning quick decision last week. The Chicago-based Seventh U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals struck down prohibitions from Indiana and Wisconsin in a 40-page opinion issued a mere nine days after the court heard oral argument.

Not to be outdone, attorneys general from those two losing states moved even faster in appealing the Seventh Circuit’s ruling to the Supreme Court.  Indiana and Wisconsin each filed petitions with the high court Tuesday, jockeying to have their cases be the ones in the spotlight.  Challengers to bans in those two states filed responses with the Supreme Court right away, also urging high-court intervention. The sprint to submit the documents allowed the two cases to make the list for the justices’ first private conference, a remarkably swift turnaround time rarely seen at the court.

via Supreme Court to Discuss Gay Marriage – Law Blog – WSJ.

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